20 Sustainable Travel Bloggers to Follow in 2020 for Epic Eco-Friendly Inspiration

I realized recently that I follow a lot of travel influencers, but not nearly enough sustainable travel bloggers. Entering 2020, I wanted to flood my feed with more eco-friendly vacation inspiration, and also diversify my feed to include more women of color, as the travel sphere can be pretty white. (As a white woman trying to blog about sustainable travel myself, I mean no offense by this.)

After some research, I’ve put together a list of 20 sustainable travel bloggers that you need to follow immediately. Some I’ve been following since I started Suitcase Six while others are newer to me. I promise they will collectively help inspire, educate, and motivate you to make 2020 your most sustainable (and responsible) year yet, in your travels and your daily life!

photo of scrabble letters spelling "travel tips" on a white background.  these sustainable travel bloggers provide super helpful travel tips for an eco-friendly adventure and lifestyle.

I’ve got another list already growing so I plan to continue sharing my sustainable travel blogger roundups in future months. And I haven’t included myself on the list but of course, I recommend Suitcase Six, and hope you stick around for the year of eco-content I’m planning!

Without further ado…

Miss Filatelista

Why I recommend her:

I’ve followed Miss Filatelista for maybe two years now and she’s one of my favorite sustainable travel bloggers. She’s a freelance writer and between her personal blog and articles she’s written for other publications she’s constantly churning out helpful and unique content.

On her blog you’ll find tons of vegan food guides, reviews of sustainable accommodations and tours, and beautiful photos from location she’s been. On twitter, I find myself wanting to like or retweet nearly all of her tweets and I’ve learned so much from her content about sustainable travel, feminism, and human rights in general. 

Lola and her sister have also founded Latinas Love Travel, whose instagram you can find here: https://www.instagram.com/latinaslovetravel/ 

My favorite articles:

Green Mochila 

Why I love them:

Green Mochila focuses on South American destinations and they dive into the culture, societal issues, and specific issues in sustainability (both environmentally and otherwise) on their blog. They spent an entire year traveling South America in true slow-travel style, and I appreciate that their content goes beyond surface level itineraries.

My Favorite Articles:

EcoKats

Why I recommend her:

Get your daily dose of outdoor inspiration filled by Ketki, with some tips on how to get around sustainably and let nature do it’s thing! She’s got a ton of content on India for your trip planning needs as well, which I’ve been reading up on eagerly.

My favorite article:

Two Dusty Travelers

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**Who are poachers?** >> Before traveling with conservationists in Africa, I always thought of poaching as killing endangered animals to sell their parts (ivory for jewelry, rhino horn for Chinese medicine, pangolin scales to eat as a delicacy, etc). I pictured crime syndicates and career criminals and lots of $$ changing hands. But there’s much more to the reality of poaching in Africa. >> Poaching means illegal hunting – and there’s more than one reason to hunt illegally. In Mozambique’s Gilé National Reserve, most poaching is not for selling internationally, but rather for bushmeat. Which means the local community hunts in the park because that food is what they survive on. (It’s not like you can pop out to the corner store and grab a microwave meal way out here in the bush.) >> When you live steps away from a conservation area with plenty of animals and you’re barely eking out a living growing cassava on a tiny plot of land, why wouldn’t you hunt the way your ancestors always have? But population growth means this park simply cannot sustain the local community any longer, and animals beloved by tourists and essential to the ecosystem are being completely wiped out. >> This is why effective anti-poaching measures need to work WITH the local community, not start a war with them. People will do whatever it takes to provide for their families, no matter how many guns you shoot and fences you build. >> A new program in Gilé allows locals to exchange poaching traps for agricultural equipment (check out our stories to see some of the gnarly traps they’ve collected, like these spears that could be used to bring down an elephant). And educational programs are teaching the community around the park how to farm sustainably, so they won’t have to rely on bushmeat. (Locals can still legally hunt small game for subsistence, as long as they leave endangered species alone.) >> When we try to find solutions to poaching, I think it’s important to remember that many poachers are just regular people, not criminal masterminds trying to destroy beloved species. >> Does this change your perspective on poaching? . . . #gilénationalreserve #poaching #antipoaching #visitmozambique

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Why I love them:

Two Dusty Travelers is another duo I’ve followed for quite a while. They’re constantly churning out valuable pieces on volunteering while traveling, eco-friendly products, and lesser-discussed topics like ethical social media use or medical mission work. I recommend setting aside an hour our two to pour over the content on their blog.

I also recommend following them on instagram where they’re regularly sharing useful information and sustainability news on their Insta story!

My favorite articles:

Mexico Cassie

Why I recommend her:

Heading to Mexico? Cassie has you covered. Literally – she has posts on areas in nearly every region in Mexico from the Yucatan Peninsula up to the Northern regions of Sonora and Chihuahua. Some of these posts specifically address sustainable living, while others help you dive into the rich culture and traditions Mexico has to offer. Plus so many food posts – and who doesn’t want to become well versed in Mexican cuisine?

My favorite article:

Sustainable Living In Merida: Where to Shop and Eat

Teja on the Horizon 

Why I recommend her:

Teja doesn’t put on a facade about her travels – she’s open and upfront about where she struggled to travel sustainably, and how she can improve next time. She provides some region-specific tips on how to been more green on the road too, and has gotten involved with some wonderful social enterprises which she shares on her blog.

My favorite article:

Mikaela Loach

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Only 2% of people making clothing all over the world earn a living wage. 75% of these people are women.⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ Let it sink in that 98% of the people who make our clothes are not paid enough to meet their own basic needs. Sit with that fact: don’t scroll past it or gloss over it. The reason for this: a demand for cheap clothing and valuing this desire over these people’s lives. ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ The fashion industry has historically exploited and abused it’s workforce. A workforce mainly made up of women. Cases of sexual violence in the workplace are common, unionising is often prohibited or met with violence and workplaces are unsafe. These are the experiences faced by the same women making clothing for @topshop, @boohoo, @prettylittlething, @zara, @hm, @missguided, & all other highstreet chains, who claim to be selling female empowerment through making you look good in their clothes. These companies have the cheek to have women who aren’t paid a living wage to make T-shirts with slogans like “GRL PWR” or “feminist” or other “empowering” phrases on them. Who’s empowerment is this? Is it even true empowerment if the women making the garments are not given workplace rights or fair wages and treatment? Or do we only care about the empowerment of women in the Global North?⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: our desire for expression should not cause someone else’s oppression.⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ Fast fashion is a feminist issue. It’s a climate issue. It’s a health issue. ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ We’ve got to come together and put pressure on these companies to do better. Watch @truecostmovie. Join @fash_rev in asking brands to publish their lowest wage. Not the average wage, not the price per garment, but the LOWEST wage of anyone in their supply chain. When brands have to do this, those most vulnerable in their supply chains are protected, as well as everyone else. They can’t wiggle out of this one with vague ethics reports & claims of “adhering to country regulations”. So keep asking them, join in the #LowestWageChallenge. Respecting workers and giving them rights shouldn’t be something we celebrate: it should be normal. ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣ ⚡👜: @revival.collective (gifted)

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Why I recommend her:

A twitter connect recommended Mikaela to me and the instant I found her blog I knew I was a huge fan. She seamlessly weaves ethics, sustainability and responsibility into all aspects of her brand, obviously including travel, but extending to fashion, food, politics, and even the “boring” aspects of daily life like utilities. Check her out, ASAP.

My favorite articles:

Ghana #4: Business Education for Sustainable Development

Ethical Utilities: The boring stuff that is actually pretty helpful

In Locamotion

Why I recommend her:

On In Locamotion, you’ll find posts covering social justice, eco-friendly travel, culturally immersive experiences, and even tips on responsible writing. Alissa has an honest approach that isn’t afraid to share controversial opinions (why we shouldn’t be encouraging everyone to travel) and mistakes she’s made on the road and how she’s learned from them.

The content on In Locamotion is thorough and well researched, and Alissa does a great job acknowledging the privilege that many Western travelers (especially white female travel bloggers) have.

My favorite articles:

Sustainable Travel Manifesto

Why I Don’t Believe in Encouraging People to Travel

HeyAshleyRenne

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History was made! The @United #FlightForThePlanet crew flew us from Chicago to Los Angeles on the most eco-friendly flight in aviation history. #ad . ✈️ It was an honor to take part in such a significant moment in the progression of environmentalism in the travel space alongside travel influencer @comeflywithlove and eco advocate @pcousteau. The aviation industry has a long way to go in reducing its environmental impact and I’m proud to have witnessed United leading the way for others to follow in its eco-conscious footsteps. We flew with sustainable biofuel, dined with wooden cutlery, wiped our hands with bamboo napkins, and drank from an industry-first, fully recyclable-paper hot beverage cup. . 🌱 Why is sustainable biofuel such a big deal? Well, you know I’m all about electric cars, and while I’d love for planes to be electric too…that’s not a thing yet. Next best option is biofuel! Using biofuel is one of the most effective ways an airline can reduce its impact on the environment. The fuel they used on the #EcoSkies flight came from agricultural waste and has a whopping 60% less emissions than normal fuel. . ♻️ No other airline has ever combined sustainable aviation biofuel, zero cabin waste, carbon offsets, and operational efficiencies. This flight was the first of its kind and hopefully it won’t be the last. In the words of United president Scott Kirby, “This will only work to make this a better planet if our competitors do the same as well.” . 🌏 Do you support businesses that advocate for the environment? #WorldEnvironmentDay

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Why I recommend her:

Ashley’s blog isn’t just limited to travel – she shares so much knowledge on creating an eco-friendly lifestyle! From organic gardens to vegan fashion to electric cars, I found myself sucked in reading article after article and I’m sure you’ll find some tips on making your daily routine a little greener. Her instagram is also absolutely gorgeous.

My favorite article:

Small Footprints Big Adventures

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This morning I sat with more than 30 people of all ages in my home town, in a show of solidarity for victims of the recent bushfires and our ongoing drought. We peacefully but powerfully demonstrated that we will not be silent about the climate: more needs to be done, urgently. . The climate crisis is making extreme weather more frequent, bushfires more severe, and droughts longer and harsher. Our government is not listening or doing enough about it, but instead is opening new coal mines and giving water away, while offering ‘thoughts and prayers’ to victims. . I will not be silent on this issue, and neither will many people who believe the science and are already being impacted by climate change. More and more people are mobilising and taking action into their own hands. Some passionate members of our local 350.org group organised this event in a matter of days, and this was an excellent response for our town, especially in such a short timeframe. . Thank you @sophieisobelasher and @kiasmi90 for all of your work to organise today: in taking a stand you’ve inspired many people. Thank you also to everyone who came along today, including our State MP @ali_cupper_mp and Councillor @modica4mallee, and to those who couldn’t sit with us but still voiced your support. . We’re not alone with our concerns, we’re part of a network of millions of people across the world. Today and every climate strike date brings us closer and keeps our concerns in the spotlight, which is where they need to be until much more is done. . @ss4c @350.org.au

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Why I recommend them:

Small Footprints Big Adventures blends sustainability with family travel, and parents should be here for it! From responsible travel guides with suggestions on kid-friendly activities, to thought pieces on respectful photography, there’s a ton of useful posts to work through. It’s hard enough being eco-friendly as an individual but parents will find great suggestions on how to raise more eco-friendly kiddos which is something our planet really needs.

My favorite article:

The Awkward Traveler

Why I recommend her:

Aside from her stunning insta photos, Kay offers a beautiful blog with insightful think pieces dedicated to inclusivity and expanding your world view. In addition, she has some amazing round-ups of Latin, Black, and Asian bloggers to keep you inspired for years to come.

If you love reading about the destinations you visit, The Awkward Traveler also offers suggestions on books to read that are written by local authors. YES.

My favorite articles:

Midlands Traveller

Why I recommend them:

Simone has some great eco-friendly travel posts, but I also love the rest of her eco-content. From ideas on sustainable gifts for co-workers to making your appliances more green, she’ll have you whipped into sustainable shape in no time. If you’re a fellow foodie, she’s got posts for that too that will leave you drooling.

My favorite article:

Spin the Windrose

Why I recommend them:

Firstly and unrelated to sustainability, Abbi’s blog is gorgeous. But to the real point, she has so many great posts on sustainable travel, plus lifestyle and vegan guides, and she’s open about things she’s tried she wouldn’t do again. I’ve definitely made choices in my travels I regret and wouldn’t encourage others to try, and I love anyone who can be honest that we aren’t perfect and sometimes our initial judgement isn’t 100% correct.

My favorite article:

Silly Little Kiwi

Why I recommend her:

Tara’s blog and instagram are beautiful, and she’s been blogging since 2011 so there’s a wealth of information there. I’m partial to the fact Silly Little Kiwi has some wonderful articles about my birthplace and hometown, (Bloomington and Indianapolis, respectively). Don’t miss the responsible travel guides for Budapest and Spain – major European cities with so much tourism that eco-travel is all the more important!

My favorite article:

How to travel responsibly in budapest: locally-led tours, social enterprise cafés, + What you can’t miss in hungary’s capital

Soul Travel

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We’ve been painting a positive picture of Goa the last few posts, but there’s no denying Goa has more than its share of tourism-caused problems. ⁣ ⁣ The beaches of central Goa are becoming so crowded during high season that you can forget any romantic ideas of finding a quiet spot of beach. ⁣ ⁣ Jungle is being destroyed, buildings put up, the strain on resources (such as water) is getting more, and 90%+ of shops on coastal Goa are catering to tourists rather than locals. ⁣ ⁣ We’re not saying don’t go to Goa, but Goa urgently needs some TLC from her visitors. Here are some ways you can help: ⁣ ⁣ ✔️Don’t use single use plastic. Eat in, don’t buy bottled water (drink filtered water instead & carry your own refillable bottle). Goa has no recycling so most plastic ends up in the water/nature. ⁣ ⁣ ✔️Avoid hotels with pools on the beach. This is not allowed due to water shortages but some hotels have “bent”⁣ The rules. ⁣ ⁣ ✔️Stay at a homestay or resort/lodge that cares about local culture & environment. Pictured here is Yab Yum in Ashwem, one of our favourite eco-friendlier hotels. ⁣ ⁣ ✔️Take some time out from the beach to experience Goan culture – Goa has incredible history, heritage and food! ⁣ ⁣ ✔️Support local & sustainable operations wherever you can. We highly recommend a trip with @konkanexplorersgoa to see more of Goa’s nature on their solar powered boats! 💚⁣ ⁣ ✔️Travel outside of peak season. Goa is rammed from Dec-Feb, especially over new year. If you can, travel in shoulder season (october, March, April). The beaches of Goa mainly shut down from May-October but you can still enjoy the lush interiors! 🌴🌴⁣ ⁣ What tips would you add to our list? ⁣ ⁣ ————⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ NEW: Share your Soul Travel moments with us by using & tagging #soultravelmoment for your chance to be featured! ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ ————⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣ #Goa #sogoa #goatourism #gogoa #pickmygoapic #goadiaries #goan #northgoa

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Why I recommend them:

Ellie and Ravi have a gorgeous blog with in-depth guides on sustainable travel in India, London, and other popular destinations. They also have some well written posts on the concept of sustainable travel and how to make a positive impact with our travels that are well worth a read. I found a guest post they’d written on another blog too, included below, on how to find relatable tour operators and I kind of want to print it off and frame it.

My favorite articles:

A guest post on another blog, but one I think is important!

23 of the Best Eco Resorts in India, for the Eco Conscious Traveler

Everywhere All The Time

Why I recommend them:

I appreciate a writer who doesn’t sugarcoat their opinions, and Bani does just that with so many articles on topics I haven’t heard many others I follow discuss, specifically relating to their tagline, “decolonizing travel culture”. I’m eager to read through more of Bani’s publications on their blog and other platforms; there’s a lot of perspective changing pieces there I believe will make us all better travelers. Entering 2020, perspective and understand is something we could all benefit from – so get reading!

My favorite article:

The Shooting Star

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The more I travel, the more I think about what I’m spending my money on. Is my tourism money destroying the indigenous ecosystem or helping restore it? Is it supporting the captivity and unnatural way of life of wild animals? Is it going towards an establishment whose waste harms the ocean and marine life? Or is it encouraging efforts to protect the environment? . . That means the more I travel, the more I ask questions. Besides the experience itself, I ask about electricity and waste and water. I observe the use of plastic and the food on offer. I try to gauge environmental commitment in big and small ways. So the more I travel, the harder it becomes to find places that aren’t just “greenwashing” – pretending to be green. . . Luckily here in South Africa, I’m really glad @destinatetravel recommended the new Pioneer Trail by @gondwanagr – a walking wildlife safari (see yesterday’s post for deets). We slept in solar-powered camps, got water only in recycled glass / 2L reusable hiking bottles, the camp waste is segregated for composting and recycling, half the reserve’s naturalists are women, we got special vegan meals (though the irony of serving animal products at a wildlife lodge always gets to me), there is a strong anti-poaching unit, and our trail guides were some of the most passionate naturalists I’ve met so far 💚 . . The more I travel, the luckier I feel that there is still so much to experience, learn and discover in this world – and contribute our bit in the process 👣 . . And you, do you think about these things when you travel? . . PS: A LITTLE SURPRISE coming tomorrow! Watch this space, turn on notifications if you want 😉 . . #theshootingstar #gondwanagamereserve #southafricatravel #responsibletravel #shotoniphone

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Why I recommend her:

Put simply, Shivya is a badass. Published author of a best-selling book, she’s been featured on tons of major platforms like National Geographic and BBC travel. Rightfully so – the articles on her own blog (and there are a ton) are all full of genuinely helpful tips on responsible travel, eco-friendly wanderer, and inspiration for making meaningful connections with locals wherever you go.

My favorite articles:

How Not To Travel Like A Basic Bitch

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•PEOPLE TELLING YOU “NOT TO FLY” ARE NEVER BROWN IMMIGRANTS• Oh hey! It’s your girl Kiki out here calling you on your bullshit! ♻️ I released a podcast episode on SUSTAINABLE TRAVEL and how the “no fly” movement is short-sighted and that there’s no one-size-fits-all solution to sustainable travel. ♻️ And guess who been attacking it? WHITE EUROPEANS! ♻️ Let me break it down. White Europeans have given themselves access to travel the world since they created borders, meanwhile limiting the access to travel of Brown and Black countries. ♻️ With some of the world’s strongest passports on the smallest continent on Earth, White Europeans have the privilege of high-speed efficient train systems to give access to travel across their landmass. Meanwhile, people of the Americas cover a LARGE LAND MASS, don’t have train options to access each other in a reasonable amount of time, and literally can only access each other by flight. ♻️ People who criticize flying are ALSO ostracizing immigrants and refugees who have oceans separating them from their families and homelands. ♻️ People who criticize flying are also not the people providing sustainable jobs for those in industries where flying is mandatory, have zero understanding that flight schedules go on whether the plane is full or not, nor are they critical of the human slavery and carbon pollution it took to write me their criticisms on their phones. ♻️ And the person who was shocked that only 3% of the world travels and contributes THIS MUCH POLLUTION and was like “Imagine! What happens in 2050!” What you actually mean, is what happens when Black and Brown people finally get to fly?! ♻️ Please redirect your criticisms to the 1% who have had access to travel all this time. Write to them about their frivolous private jets that don’t even carry over 100 people and get on WAY MORE FLIGHTS than the average person! Do that before you criticize those filling up spaces on flights that carry more than one person and are gonna go ANYWAY, regardless. ♻️ Moral of the story: if you’re White European, YOU give up traveling if you’re so pressed. Leave the rest of us alone. And re-listen to EPISODE 1: TRAVEL PRIVILEGE. Tap link in bio.

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Why I recommend her:

There are so many reasons to follow How Not To Travel Like A Basic Bitch that I struggled to write this recommendation succinctly. Her content is honest and needed, calling us all out for the problematic behaviors we present when we travel, especially white people who (myself included) have a lot to learn. From talking about privilege and racism, to sharing stories and perspectives from locals, to posting an booty pic every 1000 followers on insta to illustrate you can have a PhD and show your body at the same time – I’m constantly learning from Kiona and being motivated to do better.

My favorite articles:

Soraya Earth

Why I recommend her:

Soraya is trained in sustainability for business, and lucky for us travelers, she’s turned her talents to the travel industry. Aside from eco-friendly blog posts, she organizes trips like the all-women sailing expedition to research plastic pollution, and even makes some incredible art that’s net positive. She covers all sorts of topics like photography, consultancy, and activism, but I love her out of the box articles on sailing and bamboo bikes, which I haven’t really seen anywhere else!

My favorite article:

Building A Bamboo Bike

Why Surfers Make Better Environmentalists Than Climbers (a guest post on another blog)

Sunshine & Raine

Why I recommend them:

There is so much personality in Jazzmine’s blog, and her ambitious, cheery, go-getter attitude makes me want to jump off the couch and take action. I love the diversity of articles on her blog and in the many initiatives she’s a part of in India and beyond. This is a newer blog for me and I can’t wait to be following Sunshine & Raine next year.

My favorite article:

Cooking For A Cause

Thanks for reading and making your social media feed a little more green!

I hope you’ve found some wonderful new people to follow. I already have about 12 bloggers lined up for another round-up post. If you know of anyone writing on sustainable travel, eco-friendly living, or ethical issues related to race, wealth, or gender, and their intersections with travel – send them my way!

20 Sustainable Travel Bloggers to Follow in 2020 for  Epic Eco-Friendly Inspiration

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